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.org/history. >> yesterday, a senate homeland security subcommittee on contract oversight looked at afghanistan reconstruction contracts. witnesses include contractors to receive money from the u.s. agency for international development and the army corps of engineers as well as defense department and usaid officials. missouri democratic senator clear ms. castle -- clare mccaskill chaired the two-hour hearing. if the witnesses have become -- i have a formal statement prepared but i have decided not to give a formal opening statement. and just express the reason for this hearing. this is not the first hearing we have had in the subcommittee on contract thing in our contingency operation. and i began working on this problem almost the day i wrought -- arrived in the senate. when i travel to iraq to do nothing but look at contracting oversight because i couldn't figure out how in the world things had gotten so out of control in terms of contacting in iraq. i went over to iraq and i realized why they had gotten out of control. contract and representatives were just a low man on the total bowl being
.s. policy in afghanistan and iraq. we want to begin the segment by talking with the defense policy reporter with bloomberg news. she joins us by phone. she has traveled with defense and that i ton patte iraq. talk about what you heard the defense secretary do while he was overseas. guest: it was interesting to watch secretary panetta and compare how he handled the trip and his interaction with troops and with foreign leaders to secretary gates. he has fairly big shoes to f ill, according to people who were quite complementary. leon panetta also has a lot of familiarity with u.s. military forces. forces. with the commanders and foreign leaders that he is meeting with and going to be interacting with. with his experience as cia director for more than two years before taking this job and in other capacities, for example, a member of iraq study group that did the independent assessment in 2006 of the war in iraq. host: was specifically was the defense secretary trying to accomplish on this trip? guest: he wanted to go out and touch base with the troops themselves and make that connection. it is
. >> secretary of defense making a trip to afghanistan and telling the world that al-qaida is on the verge of defeat. the most optmistic prediction of the u.s. leader yet saying the u.s. can eliminate and capture leaders in pakistan and yemen. >> i think we have them on the run. i think now is the moment. now is the moment following what happened with what happened to bin laden to put maximum pressure on them because, i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can cripple al-qaida as a threat to this country. >> and the secretary's schedule in afghanistan is packed and first the meeting with the top u.s. commander general petraeus here and holding a face to face with afghan hamid karzai. they want to with draw 23,000 troops. >> david piper is on the phone from kabul. >> the newly appointed defense secretary arrive went straight in the talks with afghan president karzai and he said the draw down of u.s. troops. he hopes to drive the taliban to peace talks in that period so there can be a reconcilation in this country and the defense secretary w upbeat about killing out al-qaida.
panetta went to iraq and afghanistan. he did not go to pakistan. i take that as a strong message. it is easy when you're in that region to attack on an extra couple of days for an important ally. i think that cross the minds of everyone who planned the trip. it was clearly a conscious decision not to go to pakistan. i think that is in part because when osama bin laden was killed on may 2 there was a list of things that we would ask the pakistan's to do, the pakistani to do, and i have not acted on any of them. this administration also put a hold on a $10 million in assistance. a great way to resolve that is sending the defense secretary to talk to folks about what is going on, but he did not. you are seeing already how differently the pentagon will treat allies in the region. "the in this morning's financial times" they had this headline -- guest: the withdrawal deadline is aggressive. they're talking about getting half of the troops out during the prime fighting season. they do not fight as much during the wintertime. we are starting to withdraw troops during a tumultuous situat
it comes to discussing the merits of continuing our efforts in afghanistan, the republicans clamor to defend it despite our fiscal mess. i want to remind my republican friends the situation we are in now is not new. throughout history from rome to the ottoman empire to the soviet union the over extension of military and protracted struggles in foreign countries has crippled empires. some historians have credited ronald reagan for the soviet union's collapse but what really bankrupted the soviet union was its wars, just like us, they paid a crushing price both financially and morally in afghanistan. overextending geopolitically comes at a cost over time in any nation that thinks otherwise is setting itself up to repeat the mistakes of the past. as of today, the united states has spent more than 2 1/2 times the percentage of g.d.p. on afghanistan that the -- than the soviet union spent on its g.d.p. during its nine-year war in afghanistan. public polls are clear, americans know the cost of the war in afghanistan is unsustainable and want us to withdraw as soon as possible. when it co
spending in iraq and -- of spending in iraq and afghanistan. how about that? we will spend more than $833 million in the next three days in kabul and baghdad. in part to help build clean water systems there. in part to help create jobs there. i just think that's inexcusable that we find ourselves in a position where we're spending in two or three days in iraq and afghanistan when we could spend to eliminate this cut and provide clean drinking water for the people of our country. the amount of subsidies we're going to give oil companies. the oil companies made record profits in 2010. they made about $60 billion in profits, if i'm not mistaken. $77 billion, actually, in profits last year. we'll spend six times as much of this cut in the clean drinking water fund to give money away to those oil companies this year. these are people who made $77 billion in profits last year, whose stocks are off the charts, who are paying their c.e.o.'s hundreds of millions of dollars in compensation, and we're going to give them about $7 billion from the wallets of the people of this country this year. that'
a loved one in afghanistan. ethan and stephanie, bowing here at arlington cemetery, lost their father on may 12 of this year. the sergeant, who was stationed at camp lejeune marine base, and another was sent with the mission to train afghan citizens to become police. the men had just sat down to dinner when a rogue trainee opened fire killing both men. in an email to his wife the day before he died, the sergeant said, and i quote, i don't trust them. i don't trust them for anything, not anything at all. this brings me to a quote from a.c. snow's recent column tiled "time to bring them home: let them live." mr. snow is a well-known correspondent in north carolina. and i quote, it seems we never run out of wars. it is as if one small country after another sends out a grave's invitation reading, we're having a war, please come. and uncle sam borrows millions to offer freedom our nation building. mr. speaker, i go back to the two little girls in this picture. how many more children will be at the grave site of a loved one? how many more have to known the pain of war? i further quote from
and brendan in afghanistan. now their families are doing all they can to make sure that their deaths and others will not be in vain. janet manning is the mother of the late first lieutenant trafs manion and she's the widow of brendan looney and they're my guests today. first of all, so sorry for your tragic loss. it's so hard to see the pictures of them together. they were best of friends and amy, you were part of the group with them, right? >> absolutely. >> so please, if you can, share your wonderful memories of the people that you loved. >> oh, my goodness. i don't even know where to begin. i mean, i met brendan back in 2003 and, you know, we had been dating and got married in 2008. so travis, we, you know, we're both very close friends with when brendan was at the naval academy and we -- you know, they continued their friendship, you know, all the way up until 2007 and obviously, something that will carry forth always in the future, now that they're laying at rest next to each other. >> so we have a young widow here and we have a mother who mourns for the loss of her son. tel
, and we were doing great things over there. >> the 19-year-old served in afghanistan on the scout sniper platoon and we are gla he is home safe and grateful to our troops, as always, this 4th of july weekend. >> those are the headlines and now we send it over to rick for weather. rick: the summer is feeling like the end of summer for so many. look how june shaped up for us across so much. a lot of texas, the hottest junes ever in midland. and miami, florida, the driest june on record. and tulsa, oklahoma, 29 days above 90 degrees and that ties a record. and now the drought monitor: a lot of drought across the southern area of the united states from arizona to florida and the drought now beginning to stretch across the mid-atlantic. we need rain. we will not get it. and now, a look at what we have for the day today, it is actually quite a nice day with showers down across florida, and hot across the plains, and 102 in wichita and in the west we will see a nice day, finally, the west has been cool, and 77 in seattle with warm conditions and hot across the southwest. and, dave, over to you.
billion in iraq and afghanistan to train the security forces, less than $10 billion to retrain our work force for the jobs of the future. well, mr. president, i see others have come on the floor. i'll wrap this up. deficit reduction is important. i'm not saying it isn't. but it is not the single-most important thing right now. the single-most important thing is to put people back to work. that will, as senator wyden said earlier, start to create the demand. it will spur more private investment as the federal government begins to invest in the future of this country. that's where we ought to be focusing on. once we get the wheels going again, once we get people back to work and the economy start to to -- starts to grow, that's when we start to reduce the deficit. to just focus on deficit reduction right now to the exclusion of putting people back to work reminds me of when doctors used to put leaches on people who were ill. it only made them more ill because it drained more blood out of their system. and most times proved fatal, as it did to our first president, george washington. our ur
their lives in the service of our nation in iraq and afghanistan and their families and of all who serve in our armed forces and their families. the chair: without objection, two-minute voting will continue. the unfinished business is the request for a railroaded -- vord -- recorded vote on amendment number 2 by the gentleman from illinois, mr. rush, on which further proceedings were postponed, on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 2 printed in house report 112-181, offered by mr. rush of illinois. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. a sufficient number having risen, a recorded vote is ordered. this will be a two-minute vote, followed by a series of additional two-minute votes. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the chair: on this vote, the ye
that they're bringing back, they are companies specifically going after returning iraq and afghanistan veterans to be able to hire them. it was interesting, we were talking about drilling and you go into a drilling platform and they say their favorite people to be able to hire are tank drivers returning from the war zone because they're used to driving equipment, looking on a screen and dealing with multiple things all at once. these are folks employing our veterans and they're engaged in providing great jobs. i was on a fracking site, being able to watch it. it's high tech job, people on computers, as well as people in pumping, trucks, people providing food, people providing the equipment, it's people with big wrenches and people with small computers. and you see this multitude of different jobs provided by oil and natural gas and by fossil fuels we're producing right here in america. we are at a moment that we can either say, we want all green jobs, we want to destroy the jobs producing fossil fuels, or we can say, let's do both. let's encourage the growth of green jobs but let's not
corner of afghanistan. they took part in a flag-raising ceremony complete with a military band to observe the fourth of july holiday, independence day. very nice. >>> taking a look at your all-important weather, this becomes very important. we have barbecues to talk about. can't have rain on the barbecue. severe storms are possible in the dakotas and parts of minnesota. there also could be flooding rains in missouri, maryland, and arkansas. firefighters in the desert southwest could get some help from monsoon rains. it always rained in seattle when i was growing up on the fourth. >> we should say folks in texas, it's very dry, looking for some rain. in colorado, northern texas, 10 degrees warmer than usual. seattle, seasonable in the mid-70s. chicago, detroit, minneapolis, mid-80s. i can deal with that. >> that sounds pretty good. >>> the calendar says it is the 4th but the scene on washington state's crystal mountain is confusing because record snowfall has extended the skiing and snowboarding season. >> hundreds of people are expected to hit the slopes over the holiday weekend. it's a s
into a kill zone under heavy fire to find three missing marines and navy corpsman in afghanistan in 2009. sadly, they did not make it out alive, but mier is being honored for going beyond the call of duty. he's the third civilian to receive that honor from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. >> steve: what a story. >> alisyn: nail biting moment at the championship motor cross match in minnesota. look at this. >> whoa! we got trouble! zachary is down ask down hard! >> alisyn: that was motor cross rider chad reid. he was in the lead before wiping out with 450 riders coming straight at him full speed. even more incredible, reed remounted his bike, as you can see, moments later, finishing a respectable 14th in this race. wow. those are your headlines. >> brian: got to tell you what happened in the house yesterday. we heard the vote was taking place and it did. in the end it passed. cut, cap and balance and a time tally of 234-190. five democrats said that sounds good to me, but yet nine republicans defected and voted with democrats. in the end, it passed. but the republicans can say, look, you
they're dodging bullets in places like afghanistan. we'd have confidence. but instead he says he can't guarantee. mr. speaker, we know he can. we know he can guarantee. we should push that on him out of this house to let him know where we stand, so the american people understand there is a moral standard here. one is, tell the truth. the second moral standard is, pay our military, the other moral standard is guarantee the full faith and credit of the united states government. i laid out the rest of these priorities, mr. speaker and cut, cap, and balance is an important position to stand on. the leverage that's here now must be used or we shirk our responsibility. had the leverage been stronger back in 1995, that extra vote in the senate that i spoke about some minutes ago would have been there, i believe and i believe the balanced budget amendment would have been sent to the states and i believe the states would have ratified it and if that had been part of the constitution the kay i came -- the day i came here in january of 2003 i wouldn't have had to walk around on the floor and fi
not be able to do things militarily to support our troops in afghanistan and iraq. i view this, i think it bears close watching, but there is a perception that somehow we're giving our china, india, brazil and other countries an advantage. i view this program as a two-way street. it does provide a degree of access to american companies and so i would be also reluctant -- i reluctantly oppose your amendment but i can assure you that both of us feel very strongly that it bears watching. it has borne some fruit. mr. frelinghuysen: it's not money wasted, it's not money given away to competitors. thank you for yielding. mr. visclosky: but again, i think it draws attention that we should be closely monitoring these funds. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from fey rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. broun: i'd like to yield to dr. harris from maryland. mr. harris: let me briefly address this so we can move on. we only cut $6 million out of the $8 million. there's budget language further on t
eliminating money with the wars in be afghanistan and iraq. that's also future looking. so i'm asking you today in terms of changes to the tax code for corporations because we know there's plenty of corporations that last year ended up paying relatively little or no taxes at all. are you putting forward anything in terms of corporate tax reform that you would be willing to undo in loop loopholes today? is. >> i think we all agree tax loopholes are something we can do about, that's definitely an area we compromise on without any difficulty whatsoever. but the point is putting in a system of tax reform that is simpler, flatter, less cumbersome especially for our business owners in the cost of doing business. so this is what we're looking at. but we are definitely against any tax increases, any tax increases alone. martha: all right, so goldman sachs if they don't get $4 trillion, what happens is a plan that's short of $4 trillion in real spending cuts, they're likely to downgrade their rating on u.s. debt. what do you think about that? >> well, you know, that's unfortunately what we're face
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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